www.cykometrix.com

Marvel Technologies
Anthony Stork, VP, Infrastructure

Individual Report

ISTP Anthony Stork, The Crafter

People with ISTP personalities enjoy having time to think alone and are fiercely independent. ISTPs also love action, new experiences, hands-on activities, and the freedom to work at their own pace. ISTPs enjoy taking things apart just to see how they work. They are logical and rational, but are more interested in practical applications than in abstract ideas. They love doing new things and can become bored with routines rather quickly.

Strengths

  • Logical
  • Learns by experience
  • Action-oriented
  • Realistic and practical
  • Enjoys new things
  • Self-confident and easy-going

Weaknesses

  • Difficult to get to know
  • Insensitive
  • Grows bored easily
  • Risk-taker
  • Does not like commitment
Your Cykometrix

The following 7 traits contain within them what experts call the most important elements of an effective team member. Human resource experts look for these characteristics in all good employees and leaders because they know those individuals make up effective teams. Investors look for these characteristics because together, they determine a person's and team's ability to maintain effectiveness even in stressful times.

Like everyone else, you are a complex individual. Based on your responses to our questionnaires, to become a better, more effective team leader or team member, you should focus your efforts on:
  • Empathy training: become a better verbal and non-verbal communicator. This involves being open to accepting other people's emotions and expressing your own in a constructive manner. Strive to understand others' point of view before making your own known. Listen more than you speak and make sure you feel others state of mind while in conversation.
  • Collaboration training: in moments of stress, take a deep breath before engaging with your colleagues to minimize irrational thoughts. Be mindful of other's space and responsibilities - be an excellent complement to what they are trying to achieve for the team. Organize yourself with others and share your thoughts, even if uncomfortable.

Cognition

Cognition is a person's ability to reason, solve problems, to comprehend quantitative concepts, to think visually, and a person's ability to perform deductive tasks while under pressure while maintaining a decent level of creativity. This characteristic is most useful when you need to understand complex systems, how different elements relate to each other and find solutions to difficult problems.

Your Cognition is already high, but there is always room for improvement. Based on your results, where you can improve most in this trait is:
  • Quantitative reasoning: spending training time playing with numbers, construction, or even design tasks can help sharpen your ability to think with numbers. Puzzles are also a good way to do this.

Empathy

Empathy measures a person's ability to recognize, control and use emotions to maintain morale in a team even in stressful conditions. This characteristic also includes a person's ability to communicate non-verbally and verbally. A person with a high Empathy score will be able to express ideas clearly through a variety of means to ensure effective conveyance of information and understand team members clearly even while under duress.

To improve your Empathy characteristic, we suggest you focus on these:
  • Agreeableness: listen to and try other people's ideas. Team members are different than you are, but they have valuable insights to share.
  • Compassion: put yourself in your team member's shoes sometimes and look at an issue from that angle to better understand his or her point of view.
  • Ability to appraise other's emotions: some training allowing you to better gauge other people's emotional states will help you communicate better with others and develop better understanding.

Execution

Execution is a person's ability to plan, track achievements, and deliberately accomplish objectives. The Execution characteristic also includes a person's ability to empower others to execute a group strategy, and a person's general ability to take good self-motivated decisions. A person with a high Execution score achieves set goals and will effectively direct others to do the same.

Your Execution is already high, but there is always room for improvement. Based on your results, where you can improve most in this trait is:
  • Avoid Seeking Sensations: Your search for novel experiences may sometimes be getting in the way of getting the job done. Having an outlet for experiences outside of when you need to be effective may be a good way to relieve your desire for excitement.

Dependability

Dependability measures a person's reliability to others. This characteristic has within it one's ability to follow through on commitments and just how steadfast a person is in stressful situations. A person with a high Dependability score is accountable to others and doesn't let him or herself down.

Your Dependability is already high, but there is always room for improvement. Based on your results, where you can improve most in this trait is:
  • Authoritarianism: in a vacuum, being absolutist is considered bad, but balanced by positive character traits, it helps us be more dependable, less rebellious. Try to consider other people's objectives and what they expect you to achieve and train yourself to work on what others, your team, has set.

Collaboration

The Collaboration trait measures a person's ability to work through problems supporting and being supported by others. This trait is synonymous with teamwork but also includes emotional connectedness with colleagues. A person with a high Collaboration score will thrive in a team environment to accomplish set goals bringing along the whole team for a win.

To improve your Empathy characteristic, we suggest you focus on these:
  • Honesty: Sometimes being pragmatic means avoiding the truth. While it can be very useful to achieve goals, when collaborating within a team, a balancing act must be kept. A team must trust each other to be effective, and sometimes that means taking a less practical path for yourself. Trust that your team will take in the bad with the good and work with you through tough situations.
  • Avoid Seeking Sensations: Your search for novel experiences may sometimes be getting in the way of getting the job done. Having an outlet for experiences outside of when you need to be effective may be a good way to relieve your desire for excitement.
  • Agreeableness: listen to and try other people's ideas. Team members are different than you are, but they have valuable insights to share.

Presence

High Presence individuals inspire confidence in others through their force of charisma and can change other's opinions by their actions. The Presence trait also includes a person's ability to recognize other people's successes and failures. A person with high Presence is comfortable being unique and is usually the one first to act openly when a team member needs recognition.

Your Presence is already high, but there is always room for improvement. Based on your results, where you can improve most in this trait is:
  • Compassion: put yourself in your team member's shoes sometimes and look at an issue from that angle to better understand his or her point of view.

Leadership

Leadership measures a person's ability to get others to follow them through words or deeds. This characteristic includes a person's ability to inspire others to act according to their own inner motivations. A person with a high Leadership score will cause others in a team to drive towards collective and personal goals, engaging team members to work collectively towards a goal.

Your Leadership is already high, but there is always room for improvement. Based on your results, where you can improve most in this trait is:
  • Ability to appraise other's emotions: some training allowing you to better gauge other people's emotional states will help you communicate better with others and develop better understanding.

Fluid Intelligence


You can figure out solutions with very little instruction. Once a good solution has been found, you can see how it can be applied to other situations.

Quantitative Reasoning


You are able to analyze information presented in quantities (numbers, amounts) and can determine what skills, processes and equipment would best solve a problem.

Visual Processing


You have a superior ability to organize visual information into meaningful patterns and understands how these patterns may change, operate in different spaces and move through unusual geometries.

Processing Speed


You can automatically perform cognitive tasks without much effort, even under pressure. You don't need to maintain focus or concentration while doing so and can work multiple tasks in parallel.

Overall


You can recognize the existence of a problem as it arises, seek the information to solve it and use prior experience and relationships to solve it.

Extraversion


You are balanced between introvert and extrovert. You are decently agreeable, you express yourself well with others and you are comfortable in social situations.

Agreeableness


You are generally kind, you display affection for others and respect for their ideas. You develop trust with others reasonably easily.

Conscientiousness


You can engage in goal-oriented endeavors while having a decent control over your own impulses. You generally don't act on the spur of the moment and you are thoughtful.

Emotional Stability


You don't have full control of your own emotions and you tend to have difficulty bouncing back after life challenges you. You tend to be moody and anxious. Others may think you are suffering from depression or mood swings at times.

Imagination


You tend to stick to what you know and you don't particularly enjoy being creative. You are uncomfortable in situations where you need to invent something new or with change.

ISTP The Crafter

ISTPs are introverts and they tend to be quiet and reserved. They thrive on new experiences and dislike strict routines. In relationships, they are highly independent and do not like to feel controlled. Making commitments is difficult for the ISTP, but will put a lot of effort into relationships that hold their interest.

They do not often share their emotions with other people. While they enjoy hearing what other people think, they frequently keep their own opinions to themselves. For this reasons, people sometimes describe ISTPs as difficult to get to know. They often find friends who enjoy similar hobbies that they do and enjoy spending time with these friends as they pursue these activities.

Because ISTPs are introverted, they often do well in jobs that require working alone. ISTPs tend to dislike too much structure and do well in careers where they have a lot of freedom and autonomy. Because they are very logical, they often enjoy work that involves reasoning and hands-on experience. In particular, ISTPs like doing things that have practical, real-world applications.

Key Points

Typical Behavioral Patterns


Dominant Behavior: Introverted Thinking


ISTPs spend a great deal of time thinking and dealing with information in their own heads. This means they do not spend a great deal of time expressing themselves verbally, so they are often known as being quiet. It may seem like the ISTPs approach to decision-making is very haphazard, yet their actions are actually based upon careful observation and thought. They deal with the world rationally and logically, so they are often focused on things that seem practical and useful. Because they are so logical, ISTPs are good at looking at situations in an objective way when making decisions. People with this personality type can be difficult to get to know, often because they are focused so much on action and results rather than on emotions.

Auxiliary Behavior: Extraverted Sensing


ISTPs prefer to focus on the present and take on things one day at a time. They often avoid making long-term commitments and would rather focus on the "here and now" rather than think about future plans and possibilities. ISTPs tend to be very logical and enjoy learning and understanding how things operate. They might take apart a mechanical device just to see how it works. While they are good at understanding abstract and theoretical information, they are not particularly interested in such things unless they can see some type of practical application.

Tertiary Behavior: Introverted Intuition


This function often operates largely unconsciously in the ISTP personality. While they are not usually interested in abstract ideas, they may take such concepts and try to turn them into action or practical solutions. It is this function that is behind the "gut feelings" that ISTP sometimes experience when making a decision. By synthesizing information brought in by the dominant and auxiliary functions, this aspect of personality may be responsible for sudden "aha" moments of insight.

Inferior Behavior: Extraverted Feeling


This aspect of personality tends to operate in the background of the ISTP personality, but it can become more apparent during times of stress. During highly charged situations, ISTPs can sometimes lash out in sudden outbursts of emotion. They often ignore their own feelings until things reach a boiling over point, which can lead to displaying emotions in ways that can seem inappropriate.